The Impact of Ibuprofen on the Coronavirus

The WHO has analyzed 73 investigations focused on acute viral respiratory infections or conditions commonly caused by respiratory viruses.

Ibuprofen and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs do not pose any risk, but also no benefit in the treatment of people sick with coronavirus. It is the conclusion that the World Health Organization (WHO) has made public after analyzing 73 studies that have confirmed this result.

These investigations focused on acute viral respiratory infections or conditions commonly caused by respiratory viruses. The largest number of these studies was carried out in children, specifically in 46, while 28 were carried out in adults. Furthermore, another of the tests was carried out in the two groups.

According to the WHO, "there is no evidence that the use of these drugs causes serious adverse events, acute use of medical care, long-term survival or quality of life in patients with Covid-19." The UN body has verified. Furthermore, there is no clear evidence on the effects that these drugs may cause the risk of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke and myocardial infarction in adults with acute respiratory infections.

It is not necessary to have them at home

The announcement of the World Health Organization clears the doubt about the need to have ibuprofen or other anti-inflammatory drugs in our homes to treat a possible contagion, since, as this institution has pointed out, it does not have positive or negative effects on Covid-19.

However, drugs such as cortisone are used in hospitals to treat inflammation of the lungs when the coronavirus's effects are in an advanced stage. Specifically, when the sick person's alveoli become inflamed, they are at risk of developing pneumonia.